Installation using Helm

Overview Copied

This guide takes you through the deployment process of deploying Geneos containers in Kubernetes and OpenShift environments using Helm.

Helm is a package manager for Kubernetes. Helm uses a packaging format called charts. A chart is a collection of files that describe a related set of Kubernetes resources.

Charts are created as files laid out in a particular directory tree. They can be packaged into versioned archives to be deployed. ITRS provides updated Helm charts with each Geneos release.

For more information about Helm, see the Official Helm docs.

Helm prerequisites Copied

This section provides the prerequisites for installing using Helm, you must also ensure your system meets the general prerequisites for installation in a orchestrated environment.

For more info, see Data collection in an orchestrated environment.

Add the ITRS repository Copied

To add the ITRS repository, run the following command:

helm repo add itrs https://helm.itrsgroup.com

Create a registry secret Copied

Before deploying Helm charts, you must add a registry secret so that you can use the ITRS Docker repository. To do this, use the following command:

kubectl create secret docker-registry itrsdocker \
 --docker-server=https://docker.itrsgroup.com \
 --docker-username=USERNAME \
 --docker-password=PASSWORD \
 -n NAMESPACE

Kubernetes monitoring Copied

To perform Kubernetes log monitoring, you must have a Docker container configured with JSON logging.

Kubernetes Role-Based Acess Control requirements for Netprobe Copied

The Netprobe runs using a service account that requires certain Role-Based Access Control (RBAC) permissions in order to collect metrics. The required service account, roles, and role bindings are automatically created during installation. The Netprobe Helm chart will automatically create the ClusterRole and ClusterRoleBinding with get/list/watch access to node and node/proxy resources. However, it is possible to disable the automatic creation of a service account and supply your own service account and roles.

The Netprobe Helm chart will also create the following resources depending on Netprobe configuration:

Helm deployments Copied

This section provides general information that applies to all Helm deployments of Geneos components.

Create a namespace Copied

To create the geneos namespace, use the following command:

kubectl create namespace geneos

Install a Helm chart Copied

To install the chart, use the following command:

helm install -f <configuration_filename> -n <namespace> <release_name> itrs/<chart_name>

For example:

helm install -f config.yaml -n geneos netprobe itrs/netprobe

Note

Helm automatically creates the service accounts and roles. For more information, see Kubernetes RBAC Requirements.

Netprobe deployments Copied

This section provides information specific to Netprobe deployments.

One Netprobe or Collection Agent chart can be configured to connect to multiple Gateways and run in the same cluster.

Starting Geneos 6.3.x, the Helm chart now determines which collection image version is used during installation based on the configuration settings. By default, the image tag in the YAML file is blank, and the Collection Agent runs an unprivileged image as a non-root user.

agent:
  image:
    repository: docker.itrsgroup.com/collection/collection-agent
    tag: ""
    pullPolicy: IfNotPresent

To use an image with elevated file permissions, enable either log collection or persistence, or both, in the YAML file. This will start a Collection Agent image that has elevated file permissions. The word privileged in the image name indicates this. For example:

collection-agent:
    Container ID:  docker://c73f663032997adada3f8a66d8c7b626639afa43d65f1aece4edec7e44ff3ea1
    Image: docker.itrsgroup.com/collection/collection-agent:3.3.1-jre11-privileged-r0

If log collection and persistence are disabled, the default unprivileged image will be used.

Currently, the following configurations are supported:

To fetch a list of all possible configuration options, run:

helm show values itrs/netprobe

You can construct a config.yaml file using these options to fit your use case. The sections below provide minimal examples that you can adapt.

DaemonSet deployment Copied

You can deploy Netprobe as a DaemonSet to all matching nodes. Each DaemonSet pod collects metrics and logs for the pods on that node only. An additional StatefulSet is launched to collect metrics and events that are not node-specific, such as ResourceQuotas. This is the only mode that supports log collection and is the default deployment mode.

To install a Netprobe to monitor full metrics and events in all namespaces, using a DaemonSet, use the following config.yaml file:

cluster: myCluster

gateways:
- host: "10.1.1.1"
  port: 7039

netprobe:
  resources:
    limits:
      cpu:  
      memory: "1Gi"
    requests:
      cpu: "500m"
      memory: "768Mi"

agent:
  resources:
    limits:
      cpu:  
      memory: "1Gi"
    requests:
      cpu: "500m"
      memory: "768Mi"

Non-DaemonSet deployment Copied

You can deploy a Netprobe in one pod and collect metrics for the entire cluster. However, log collection is not supported in this mode.

To install a Netprobe to monitor full metrics and events in all namespaces, without using a DaemonSet, use the following config.yaml file:

mode: StatefulSet
cluster: myCluster

gateways:
- host: "10.1.1.1"
  port: 7039

netprobe:
  resources:
    limits:
      cpu:  
      memory: "1Gi"
    requests:
      cpu: "500m"
      memory: "768Mi"

agent:
  resources:
    limits:
      cpu:  
      memory: "1Gi"
    requests:
      cpu: "500m"
      memory: "768Mi"

Monitor specific namespaces Copied

By default, metrics are collected for all namespaces but you can configure your Netprobe deployment to monitor specific namespaces.

To install a DaemonSet with full metrics, events, and log collection for specific namespaces, use the following config.yaml file:

mode: DaemonSet
cluster: myCluster

gateways:
- host: "10.1.1.1"
  port: 7039

namespaces:
- ns1
- ns2

netprobe:
  resources:
    limits:
      cpu:  
      memory: "1Gi"
    requests:
      cpu: "500m"
      memory: "768Mi"

agent:
  resources:
    limits:
      cpu:  
      memory: "1Gi"
    requests:
      cpu: "500m"
      memory: "768Mi"

Gateway deployments Copied

This section provides information specific to Gateway deployments.

To fetch list of all possible configuration options, run:

helm show values itrs/gateway

You can construct a config.yaml file using these options to fit your use case. The sections below provide minimal examples that you can adapt.

Insecure installation Copied

To install a Gateway in your cluster, without TLS security, use the following config.yaml file:

licenceDaemon:
  host: localhost
  port: 7041
  secure: false

persistence:
  enabled: true
  size: 1Gi

tls:
  enabled: false

resources:
  limits:
    cpu:  
    memory: "1Gi"
  requests:
    cpu: "500m"
    memory: "768Mi"

Secure installation Copied

To install a Gateway in your cluster, with TLS security, perform the following steps:

  1. Add your tls.key and tls.cert files to your secrets by running:

    kubectl create secret tls gw-tls --key="tls.key" --cert="tls.crt"
    
  2. Deploy the Gateway, to a specified namespace, by running helm install -f config.yaml -n <namespace> gateway itrs/gateway using the following config.yaml file:

    licenceDaemon:
      host: localhost
      port: 7041
      secure: false
    
    persistence:
      enabled: true
      size: 1Gi
    
    tls:
      enabled: true
      secret: "gw-tls"
    
    resources:
      limits:
        cpu:  
        memory: "1Gi"
      requests:
        cpu: "500m"
        memory: "768Mi"
    

Installation with a setup file Copied

To install a Gateway in your cluster with an initial setup file, use the following command:

helm install -f <configuration_filename> --set-file setup.file=<setup_file> -n <namespace> <release_name> itrs/gateway

For example:

helm install -f config.yaml --set-file setup.file=gateway.setup.xml -n geneos gateway itrs/gateway

Note

If persistence.enabled is set to true and there is a saved setup file in the persistent volume, the saved setup file will be used instead of the specified setup file.

The setup file should not define the Gateway name.

Connecting to Obcerv Copied

To install a Gateway that connects to Obcerv, follow these steps:

  1. Go to the Gateway directory and generate an API key file by runnning the following command:

    ./gateway2.linux_64 -store-app-key app-key.txt <client_id> <client_secret> obcerv
    
  2. Create a secret containing your API key file by running:

    kubectl create secret generic app-key --from-file=app-key=app-key.txt -n geneos
    
  3. In the Helm configuration file, set setup.appKeySecret to the name of the secret containing the API key file and setup.obcerv.url to the Obcerv URL. For example:

    licenceDaemon:
      host: localhost
      port: 7041
      secure: false
    
    persistence:
      enabled: true
      size: 1Gi
    
    tls:
      enabled: false
    
    resources:
      limits:
        cpu:  
        memory: "1Gi"
      requests:
        cpu: "500m"
        memory: "768Mi"
    
    setup:
      appKeySecret: app-key
      obcerv:
        url: https://obcerv.example.com
    
  4. Deploy the Gateway to a specified namespace by running:

    helm install -f <configuration_filename> -n <namespace> gateway itrs/gateway
    

Helpful commands Copied

Check liveness endpoint Copied

Kubernetes has a mechanism to check the liveness of the component using the following command:

curl http://<np host>:<np port>/liveness

The command uses an http protocol if the port is insecure, and an https protocol if the port is secure.

If the component is alive, the command above will return a 200 code. Otherwise, it will return a 503 code, and will restart the container running the component.

List configuration options Copied

To see the complete list of available configuration options, run:

helm show values itrs/<chart_name>

Check chart information Copied

To check the status and version of your Helm charts, run:

helm ls

The output will look similar to:

ubuntu@ip-192-168-18-189:~$ helm ls
NAME            NAMESPACE       REVISION        UPDATED                                 STATUS          CHART           APP VERSION
netprobe        default         1               2021-08-26 18:55:28.328483978 +0800 PST deployed        netprobe-5.7.6  5.7.2

To check detailed chart information, run:

helm show chart itrs/<chart_name>

The output will look similar to:

apiVersion: v2
appVersion: 5.10.0
description: ITRS Geneos Gateway
name: gateway
type: application
version: 5.10.0-beta.5
["Geneos"] ["Geneos > Netprobe"] ["User Guide"]

Was this topic helpful?